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Hygrophila Angustifolia

This plant is a native of East Asia, Indonesia, Australia and New Zeland. It has pale green lanceolate leaves which is whitish green on the underside. The opposite submersed leaves are 7.5-10CM long and 0.5-1.2CM broad. The plant should be pruned regularly to encourage the side shoots to develop. The emersed form will take a long time to establish in the tank and are sometimes unsuccessful. An ideal back ground plant in- groups for Medium to large tanks.

Hygrophila Difformis

This species, also known as water wisteria, has aerial ovate leaves with toothed margins. These deep green emersed leaves become deeply incised and turn lime green when they grow underwater. They grow postrate in Strongly lit areas. If there is not enough light, growth will be upright with long internodes as well as less divided leaves. A thermophilic species ( heat loving ) which does well in an aquarium with temperature above 24 C.

Hygrophila Lacustris

Another novelty from the genus Hygrophila from Thailand. Submersed leaves extend upwards to a length of 10-12 CM and about 1 CM broad. The leaves are brownish green and linearly lanceolate. A demanding plant which requires soft- Medium hard acidic water. This species, planted in groups, is suited to the mid- ground position of the tank.

Hygrophila Pinnatifida

This type of Hygrophila originally is from India. It has green leaves and under the leaves is wine red. The shoots attach to wood and rocks. Growth in this plant is moderate and stems will be 14-35 CM tall and about 10-22 CM wide. The color of the plant will be attractive when it is planted in small groups.

Hygrophila polysperma

The original form is a native of India and now widely distributed in Asia. A very hardy and adaptable species. The lanceolate green submersed leaves often acquire a brown hue under Strong light. They are 2.5CM to 5 CM long and  1CM to 1.5CM broad. A few plants in the aquarium tank will soon become bushy with the growth of lateral stems. This plant should be pruned regularly, otherwise, it will form a dense growth across the water surface and deprive other plants of light. The leaf size is variable, hence, many varieties such as Hygrophila polysperma broad leaf and Hygrophila polysperma narrow leaf are now common in the aquarium plant trade. An ideal background plant which can create a green curtain across the back of the tank.

Hygrophila Rosanervis

It is a beautiful plant which grows very quickly in the right position. The plant should have suitable source of lighting and CO2,, otherwise this popular plant will lose its beautiful pink leaves. This species will change its beautiful appearance in undesirable conditions.

Hygrophila Salicifolia

This plant is a native of East Asia, Indonesia, Australia and New Zeland. It has pale green lanceolate leaves which is whitish green on the underside. The opposite submersed leaves are 7.5-10CM long and 0.5-1.2CM broad. The plant should be pruned regularly to encourage the side shoots to develop. The emersed form will take a long time to establish in the tank and are sometimes unsuccessful. An ideal back ground plant in- groups for  Medium to large tanks.

Hygrophila Salicifolia Narrow Leaf

Hygrophila Salicifolia Narrow Leaf is a plant which doesn't require much attention and makes your tanks beautiful. Its leaves are narrow and strong which need to be trimmed to keep a nice rich stem. To encourage bushyness the plant should be trimmed time to time. Fertilizer is vital to this plant, and makes the growth faster.

Hygrophila Salicifolia Rubra

Presently, the genus Hygrophila embraces all species previously belonging to Nomaphila. The genus Nomaphila is now going into oblivion. There are around 90 species reported in this aquatic genus of Acanthaceae, but not all has been precisely described or classified. Although this genus is cosmopolitan, most of the species originate from Asia. This type of Hygrophila is similar to Hygrophila Salicifolia.

Hygrophila species

Presently, the genus Hygrophila embraces all species previously belonging to Nomaphila. The genus Nomaphila is now going into oblivion. There are around 90 species reported in this aquatic genus of Acanthaceae, but not all has been precisely described or classified. Although this genus is cosmopolitan, most of the species originate from Asia.

Hygrophila Species mini

Presently, the genus Hygrophila embraces all species previously belonging to Nomaphila. The genus Nomaphila is now going into oblivion. There are around 90 species reported in this aquatic genus of Acanthaceae, but not all has been precisely described or classified. Although this genus is cosmopolitan, most of the species originate from Asia.

Hygrophila Thai Siricta

This plant originally is from Thailand. Hygrophila Thai Siricta has thin leaves and they become reddish-brown under strong light, and also light-green under the low lighting.